Victoria Hart Glavin

Autumn

October 2, 2019

The fall season is a mixture of hot and cool, leaves changing and schedules becoming more structured. Whether you’re watching your child’s soccer game, taking a long weekend drive through winding roads saturated with fresh foliage or baking up the bounty of the season – take a moment to enjoy every phase the season has to offer.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2019 All Rights Reserved

Kombucha

September 27, 2019

Kombucha is a tart, fizzy, fermented beverage made of sweetened tea and a specific culture known as a SCOBY (symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast). It has been around for thousands of years. Kombucha’s probiotic content is what has everyone’s attention. The fermentation process also creates some vitamins, including vitamin C and certain B vitamins, and tea naturally contains antioxidants. However, there’s not hard scientific evidence to confirm the various health benefits that have been associated with probiotics. Not yet, at least. Enjoy Kombuchas as an alternative to sugary soft drinks, one with a possible probiotic, and nutrient boost. Too much Kombucha, however, could mean excess caffeine and sugar, not to mention that it’s a carbonated product and that could cause digestive issues when drinking high amounts. Most bottles contain two servings, so check the label and stick to 8 ounces or less at a time.

www.tinynewyorkkitchen.com

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2019 All Rights Reserved

Mushrooms

September 24, 2019

Mushrooms should be evenly colored, feel firm and plump, and have a fresh, earthy smell. Avoid any mushrooms that are bruised or broken.

Keep packaged mushrooms in their original wrapping until ready to use. Store loose mushrooms in a paper (NOT plastic) bag to allow air to circulate.

Mushrooms trap dirt, so a good cleaning is key. Wait to clean mushrooms until ready to use. Mushrooms are like sponges. A quick rinse is ok, but it’s best not to soak them. If you do rinse mushrooms, dry them thoroughly with a kitchen towel to ensure proper browning. Instead of washing them you may use a damp paper towel or soft brush to wipe mushrooms clean.

In addition to being low in fat and sodium, mushrooms provide fiber. Mushrooms are one of the few natural food sources of vitamin D.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2019 All Rights Reserved

Curry Chicken

September 18, 2019

Pantry staples like coconut milk and curry paste liven up simple chicken in the fast and flavorful weeknight meal. 

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2019 All Rights Reserved

Healthy Snacks

September 17, 2019

Healthy snacks give your family the energy and nutrients they need throughout the day. As you plan snacks, think of them as “mini meals” that include two of the four food groups.

Try these simple nutritious snack ideas:

1. Whole grain crackers with a cheese stick

2. Fresh cut fruit with a yogurt dip

3. Nut-free trail mix. Mix dried cranberries, raisins, dried apricots, and apple rings with sunflower and pumpkin seeds, along with your family’s favorite cold cereal.

4. A small tortilla wrap spread with Greek yogurt, some jam and a banana.

5. A smoothie made with vanilla yogurt, blueberries, apples and some orange juice.

6. Vegetable sticks (like cucumbers and carrots) dipped in hummus.

Make snacks interesting by using a variety of shapes, colors, and textures.

• Offer different types of cheese (mozzarella, cheddar, Jack, Swiss) in different forms (cubes, strings, slices, and balls)
• Switch up the vegetables and fruit. Make sure you have a colorful variety in the fridge to choose from.
• Kids love to dip. Use cottage cheese, hummus, yogurt, or guacamole as healthy dips.

From planning to packing, get everyone in the family involved when making snacks. Take children grocery shopping and let them choose some of their favorite foods like breads, vegetables, fruit, and yogurts. Set aside time in the evening to pack lunches and snacks. You’ll be happy you did during the next day’s busy morning rush!

Food Allergies: Schools have different policies when it comes to food allergies. Many schools have a nut-free policy throughout the whole school, and some have policies just for some classrooms. Find out about the food allergy policy at your child’s school. Once you know about the foods that need to be avoided, keep them in mind when reading the ingredient list on food labels and when packing lunches.

Back to school snacks can be nutritious and delicious. With a little planning and creativity, your kids will love snack time at school.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2019 All Rights Reserved

Cupcakes

September 5, 2019

Cupcakes are an adaptable fun treat that makes any occasion special.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2019 All Rights Reserved

Corn

August 27, 2019

As much as I love this hand-held summer superstar teamed or grilled, a little effort goes a long way in creating a more substantial summer side. I love cutting corn right off the cob, getting chunky clumps of corn kernels that I then lightly sauté – this brings out a bold sweetness. Sautéing tends to brighten the corn, and it holds up well on its own or tossed with other ingredients.

Please don’t open any ear of corn at the market looking for perfection. You can feel if it is a big intact fat ear. Corn holds up best cold and in its own packaging, the husk.

As soon as corn begins to warm, the sugars break down and corn gets starchy. Tearing it open exposes and warms the cob, and you’re ruining it for everyone.

To slice, hold the pointed stalk end in your hand like a handle, with the flat end on a clean cutting surface. Slice corn off the cob starting about halfway down, holding firmly running a knife down the cob. Go around the cob, then turn over to get the other half.

When sautéing, do not overcook. As soon as the corn darkens from its yellow-milky tone to a darker shiny kernel it is done. Remove from heat and to stop the cooking process, spread out on a sheet pan, and refrigerate just to cool.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2019 All Rights Reserved

Cooking For Yourself

August 23, 2019

In theory, it should make little difference to your health whether you cook for yourself or let someone else do the work. But unless you can afford to hire a private chef to prepare meals exactly to your specifications, letting other people cook for you means losing control over your eating life, the portions as much as the ingredients. Cooking for yourself is the only sure way to take back control of your diet from the food scientists and food processors, and to guarantee you’re eating real food and not edible foodlike substances, with their unhealthy oils, high-fructose corn syrup, and surfeit of salt. Not surprisingly, the decline in home cooking closely parallels the rise in obesity, and research suggests that people who cook are more likely to eat a more healthful diet.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2019 All Rights Reserved

Handheld Pastries

August 21, 2019

Handheld pastries are fabulous for picnics and beach time. Everyone can dig in without the need for utensils.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2019 All Rights Reserved

Panzanella

August 15, 2019

Making a classic Italian bread salad is a nice way to use up those summer tomatoes.

Latest Recipes

Standing Rib Roast With Jus

Standing Rib Roast With Jus

Lighter Pasta Alfredo

Lighter Pasta Alfredo

Sheet Pan Eggnog Pancakes

Sheet Pan Eggnog Pancakes

Sweet Potato Casserole With Marshmallows

Sweet Potato Casserole With Marshmallows

Bacon Wrapped Turkey Breast

Bacon Wrapped Turkey Breast