Irish

A Favorite St. Patrick’s Day Dish

March 17, 2018

It’s that time of year again, in America, when the beer turns green and the aroma of corned beef and cabbage fills the air. The dish is so comforting, but just what is corned beef? The term has nothing to do with corn, but was the English term for a small granule, such as a grain of salt. In days before modern refrigeration, salting meat was a way to preserve it and keep it from spoiling.

Corned beef is an Americanized addition to the traditional Irish diet. While colcannon (boiled potatoes, cabbage, and leeks in buttermilk flavored with wild garlic) was a common Irish dish, as was brown soda bread, corned beef was produced primarily for export to England. Upon arriving in America, however, it’s thought the Irish chose to celebrate their holiday with food that was typically not available to them in their home country, so corned beef was added to the menu, as was white soda bread studded with currants and caraway.

Corned beef is typically made from beef brisket, which is a cut of meat from the breast or lower chest, but the rump, bottom round, and even tongue, can be used. In America, the term “corned beef” is used to describe both the cured meat and the canned stuff found on grocery store shelves. In Britain, they call the canned stuff “salt beef.”

To make corned beef the meat is simmered in a blend of corned beef spices that usually include peppercorns, garlic, mustard, tarragon, thyme, parsley, cloves, and nutmeg.

In New England, you most often see corned beef served as a St. Patrick’s Day main dish or in a sandwich. As the main ingredient in New England Boiled Dinner, corned beef often pairs with potatoes, carrots, turnips, and cabbage in a hearty, savory, brothy bowl of goodness. When used in a sandwich, the most popular corned beef sandwich is the Reuben. Considered the quintessential Jewish deli sandwich, a Reuben is toasted rye bread stuffed with hot slices of corned beef, usually piled high, and topped with sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, and either Russian or Thousand Island dressing.

In New England, a frequent point of interest is also whether you prefer red vs. gray corned beef. The difference is “Red” brisket is cured with nitrite, which gives the meat its signature color. “Gray” corned beef, which is considered the authentic New England variety, is not cured with nitrate, so color forms naturally as it brines.

If you have corned beef leftovers a New England favorite is corned beef hash, which is typically served for breakfast.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2018 All Rights Reserved

Trick-Or-Treat

October 31, 2016

Trick-Or-Treat

In the mid-19th century, Irish immigrants to North America brought with them the Gaelic celebrations of All Hallows’ Eve, replete with trick playing and fortune telling. At that time, pranks were mild. Shop signs were switched, gates disassembled, and flour-filled socks were flung at those wearing black coats. Over time the mischief evolved into straight-up vandalism, and people often awoke on November 1st to broken windows or even blazing fires. At the height of the Great Depression, some cities considered banning the holiday. But a few cities, like Chicago, had a much better idea – to busy the idle hands of potential troublemakers with festivities and encourage homeowners to do the same. Because money was scarce, families often held “house-to-house parties,” which kept the children moving door to door for a different entertainment or treat. I guess treats are an excellent bribe for warding off mischief.

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“Work With What You Got!”

© Victoria Hart Glavin Tiny New York Kitchen © 2016 All Rights Reserved

St. Patrick’s Day 2016

March 17, 2016

Tiny New York Kitchen Wishes You A Very Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Saint Patrick’s Day

March 17, 2015

On Saint Patrick’s Day There Is Magic In The Air! Tiny New York Kitchen Wishes You A Happy Saint Patrick’s Day!

Saint Patrick’s Day Breakfast

March 16, 2013

Saint Patrick’s Day Breakfast

How lucky we are this year that Saint Patrick’s Day falls on the weekend so how about having a traditional full Irish breakfast.

Start with traditional bangers and then choose either Canadian bacon or double hickory smoked bacon.  Add Eggs, grilled tomatoes, soda bread, baked beans and coffee or Irish breakfast tea.   You can top your grilled tomatoes with grated cheese and herbs or have them just grilled.  Your eggs can be fried, poached or scrambled. 

Bangers are the cornerstone of the traditional full Irish breakfast.  Irish loin bacon is very similar to Canadian bacon as both are cut from the pork loin and are fairly lean meats.  They are cured and not smoked.  Irish bacon also has a small bit of tail meat connected to the eye of the loin.  Double hickory smoked bacon is very similar to American bacon or what is called streaky bacon in the British Isles.  This type of bacon comes from the pork belly and is easily distinguished by the stripes of lean and fat that run through it.  Double hickory smoked bacon is a fine substitute if you decide not to use Canadian bacon. 

Irish breakfasts vary from cook to cook and region to region by incorporating local specialties. Some regional favorites include mashed potatoes that are fried with leftover vegetables, blood sausage or sautéed mushrooms. 

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