Family

Yule Log

December 15, 2017

The origins of the Yule log can be traced back to the Norsemen of northern Europe. Jol or Jule (pronounced “Yule”) was a festival celebrated on the Winter Solstice in honor of Joinir, also known as Odin, the god of ecstasy and death. Feasting and drinking would take place around bonfires, and fires would be lit in hearths.

This tradition spread to other parts of Europe, where tree worship was already part of pagan rituals. Households would venture into the woods on Christmas Eve and cut a log from an oak tree, which was then transported home, with much singing and merrymaking along the way. The log would be put on the fire, which would be kept burning for twelve days. This was believed to bring health and productivity to the family and their crops for the coming year and protect them from witchcraft and demons. When the fire was finally extinguished, a small piece of wood would be kept and used to light the next year’s log. Often the ashes would be scattered over the fields to ensure fertility.

Later on, the yule log was used as a decorative centerpiece for the Christmas table, and as stoves replaced giant household hearths, the pastry or chocolate logs we are familiar with today came into being.

“Work With What You Got!”

© Victoria Hart Glavin Tiny New York Kitchen © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Dining Al Fresco

May 12, 2017

If you’re preparing for an outdoor party or get-together set the stage ahead of time by purchasing disposable plates, cups, silverware, and napkins. Make sure to have trash bags, paper towels, and cleaning supplies on hand. Clear off the counters and dishwasher in advance, so you have an open work space. If you’re dining al fresco for two then, by all means, use real dishes.

During your party or get-together make sure to leave trash and recycling bins accessible to guests. Because you’re unable to monitor everything, recruit a few people to help you take charge of specific tasks like replenishing drinks and periodically clearing away trash.

For cleanup use large trays for transporting food and supplies back to the house. Pack up leftovers, using resealable bags instead of more bulky plastic containers. Soak pots, pans, grill tools, and dishes to make them easier to clean. Designate a family member to clean one section of the yard.

“Work With What You Got!”

© Victoria Hart Glavin Tiny New York Kitchen © 2017 All Rights Reserved

Family & Thanksgiving

November 16, 2016

Family & Thanksgiving

More than any other holiday, Thanksgiving has evolved as a time to gather together. On Christmas most Americans stay at home, but on Thanksgiving, many pack up and leave home to spend the holiday with relatives and friends. This is nearly as old a custom of the day as having turkey and pumpkin pie.

The reunion tradition arose in the early eighteenth century as families began dispersing across New England to settle on the frontiers of New England (western Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine). Gradually, before and after the Revolutionary War, New Englanders pressed into New York State, Ohio, and even parts of the southern colonies and territories. In the nineteenth century, hundreds of New Englanders went west during the Gold Rush and subsequent westward migrations. And as Boston, New York, and other towns grew into cities, young people left farms to join businesses or to work in industries in urban centers. Thanksgiving was the time people chose for family reunion, to go back to the old homestead for a visit. It still is.

“Work With What You Got!”

© Victoria Hart Glavin Tiny New York Kitchen © 2016 All Rights Reserved

Easter 2016

March 27, 2016

Tiny New York Kitchen Wishes You & Your Family A Very Happy Easter!

Bread: Legend And Lore

June 1, 2014

Bread: Legend And Lore

Bread: Legend And Lore

Bread – “The Symbol of Friendship & Hospitality.” In ancient times many cultures believed bread was a Gift from God. Live a good life and “Break Bread With Friends!

English – “Bread is the Staff of Life.”

Russian – “Bread is the symbol of friendship.”

Spanish – “All sorrows are less with bread.”

Italian – “Bread is all food, the rest is merely accompaniment.”

German – “Bread is the symbol of home and family.”

French Saying – “As good as bread.”

Danish – “Bread is better than the song of the birds.”

American Indians danced the “Bread Dance” for prosperity and good crops.

Slavic Proverb – “Without bread even a palace is sad, but with it a Pine Tree is Paradise.”

© Victoria Hart Glavin

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Thanksgiving Emergency Strategies

November 25, 2013

Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving Emergency Strategies

Help, help, I have extra guests coming!  My gravy doesn’t look right!  What to do?  These are some holiday entertaining questions that I have been asked over the years. Whether this is the first time you’ve hosted Thanksgiving dinner or your 20th time there are always things that seem to come up that feel like emergencies.  From lumpy gravy to unexpected guests the pressure can just be too great at times.  Not to worry, these are some good strategies that have helped me cope and make everything run smoothly. 

Dear Victoria: “My turkey is still a bit frozen and my dinner is in a few hours.  What should I do?”

Put that bird into a large pot and run tepid water over it for at least an hour.  You can butterfly the turkey so that it cooks faster which should take about an hour and a half at 400 degrees.  You can then roast it or grill it.  In the future you may want to consider purchasing a fresh turkey and not a frozen one.

Dear Victoria:” I called everyone to the table and started carving the turkey to find that parts of it are still raw or undercooked. How embarrassing!  What should I do?”

This situation has happened to most of us at one time or another.  Don’t skip a beat and just carry on carving off any parts that are cooked, serve those and put the remaining pieces back in the pan, cover with foil, and cook until done.  Most likely the breast meat will be done.  Your guests can get a bit of turkey along with your delicious sides while waiting for the rest of the turkey to come out of the oven.  In the future you may want to consider carving the turkey first and then cooking it. 

Dear Victoria: “I always seem to overcook the turkey.  I just don’t know how I keep doing this.  Please help!”

For the immediate remedy I suggest you have LOTS of gravy on the table to pour over those dried out pieces of turkey.  In the future make sure to invest in a meat thermometer.  Insert the thermometer into your cooked turkey through the thickest part of the breast until it hits the breastbone.  Remove the turkey from the oven when it reads 160 degrees.  Let your turkey rest for about 30 minutes before carving. 

Dear Victoria: “I have a small kitchen and don’t have much room in my oven to cook everything. How am I going to get everything done?”

Tiny New York Kitchen knows this situation all too well! First of all there are plenty of things that you can get cooked in advance.  Check your menu and see what you can prepare before needing to place your turkey in the oven.  If you have an outdoor grill, then by all means grill your bird.  Hey, you can play it off as the “hip thing to do.”  Let your side dishes cook in the oven while your turkey is grilling out there in the fresh November air!

Dear Victoria: “I made stuffing and it is pretty soggy.  How can I make it un-soggy?”

This is a super easy one.  Scoop it out of the turkey and/or the baking dish and spread it out on a baking sheet.  Place it in the oven and bake it at 350 degrees until it is how you want it.  Scoop it back into the serving dish and serve.  No one will be the wiser. 

Dear Victoria: “Before I call my guests to the table the food starts to get cold.  How can I avoid this?”

Cover serving dishes with lids or foil to keep them warm.  If a dish actually gets really cold, that is supposed to be hot, then just put it back in the oven for a little bit.  Don’t be too concerned, however, as most Thanksgiving dishes are perfectly fine at room temperature. 

Dear Victoria: “My side dishes aren’t browned on top? They just don’t look that appetizing. What should I do?”

If a dish is fully cooked, but doesn’t have that delicious looking brown surface (Potatoes, Vegetables, Stuffing, etc.) then simply put them under a hot broiler at least 4 inches away from the heating element.  You may want to turn them as needed until browned on top.  MAKE SURE that you watch them carefully.  You really don’t want them to go from pasty to burned up!  Always put the food too far from the broiler rather than too close.  If you follow these instructions then you will get a nice browned crust on top of your dishes. 

Dear Victoria: “My gravy looks way too lumpy. I can’t serve lumpy gravy!  How do I fix it?”

Not to worry.  You will just need to put some hard work into it with a good whisk.  Whisk those lumps out.  It may take a bit of time, but it can be done.  If you have really stubborn lumps add just a bit of hot liquid to coax them out while you whisk. If you STILL can’t get them out take a medium weave strainer and set it over a bowl.  Pour the grave in and stir.  Smooth gravy will flow through the strainer and the lumps will stay behind.  For the future make sure you whisk the flour or cornstarch constantly while you are adding the broth or turkey juices to keep lumps from forming. 

Dear Victoria: “Help, my gravy is just way to thick.  It looks like brown jelly. How do I thin it out?”

This one is super easy.  Drizzle in a bit of hot broth or hot water while whisking and then heat up your gravy until it’s piping hot. 

Dear Victoria: “My gravy is too thin.  It looks watery. I’m horrified. Is there a good solution to this hot mess?”

This problem is just a bit trickier.  Brown 1 tablespoon for every cup of gravy by stirring it in a dry frying pan over a medium heat until it turns a nice deep golden brown.  Have your gravy in a wide pan on the stove over a medium high heat.  Whisk the browned flour into your gravy and cook.  Make sure to whisk constantly until your gravy thickens.  This should do the trick. 

Dear Victoria: “The top of my pumpkin pie is all cracked and looks horrible.  What happened?  How can I serve a cracked pumpkin pie?”

Your pumpkin pie was over baked which is why it is cracked on top.  Not a soul needs to know, however, if you dollop on whipped cream and carry it to the table like the prize pie it is!  Sometimes cooking is like acting.  If you flub a line you just carry on like that is how it is supposed to be. 

Dear Victoria: “My sister called and asked if she could bring extra guests. My goodness, what am I going to do?  Dinner is in an hour!”

I’ve certainly encountered this situation plenty throughout my dinner party throwing life.  I’ve always kept an open door policy because I figure that not everyone has a place to go on the holidays, which can be very sad and lonely.  The good news is that most of us make way too much food for Thanksgiving.  Having unexpected guests can impact a meal however.  First of all, forget any leftovers that you were counting on.  Make more mashed potatoes, rice or pasta.  These items take 30 minutes or less to make.  Slice the turkey thin.  Make a quick soup by combining chicken broth, pureed cooked vegetable(s), fresh herbs, salt and pepper. As soon as you get the call immediately put bowls of nuts and snacks out before dinner. 

Dear Victoria: “I have quite a large group coming for dinner and I don’t have enough room at the table.  What do I do?”

You can set up dinner buffet style or you can set up multiple tables as auxiliary eating areas.  Living room coffee tables and game and/or card tables work.  You can let everyone sit where they want or you can seat people by age or alphabetically or however you decide to seat people.  Thanksgiving is about spending time with friends and family.  People will have fun no matter where they are sitting.  Relax and enjoy yourself. 

 

10 Steps For Staying Happy Through The Holiday Season

November 18, 2013

Vintage Christmas Lights

10 Steps For Staying Happy Through The Holiday Season

Thanksgiving is almost here which marks the beginning of the holiday season. With so many holiday pressures often times we forget what truly is important.  We are busy shopping, cooking and wondering how to deal with some unsettled family business.  Over the weekend I came down with a nasty flu, which is in full swing as I write this.  To be sick is no fun to say the least, but I do take it as a sign to slow down and reflect.  Here are some ideas for staying happy through the holiday season.  I hope that you take time to enjoy the holidays. 

Do Something Random For The Fun Of It

What have you always wanted to do, but came up with an excuse not to?  What made you happy as a kid?  Think about things you did, during the holidays, which were fun during the holidays and relieve them as a grown-up.  If you have children then introduce your fond activities to your kids. Go ice-skating, go to a hokey play, watch your favorite movie or read a favorite children’s book. 

Give Back

Doing something for others is a powerful thing.  Volunteer your time or donate money to a favorite cause or something that speaks to your heart is important.  It’s a good thing to do and trust me it will make you feel good. 

Take Care Of Yourself

It’s important to do things for yourself.  Schedule a mani-pedi or a massage.  Take a nap, take a day off and read in bed.  Do whatever it is that you need to do to recharge.

Commune With Nature

So often we forget to go outside and do something for nature.  Pick up garbage, feed the birds, start a compost pile, rake up leaves or whatever needs doing.  You will be doing something good for nature and by being outside you will feel better. 

Get Active

It may be chilly outside, but go out for a walk or run anyway.  We need the vitamin D and to get our blood pumping.  Ride your bike, go skiing or sledding.  If you can’t get outdoors then go to your local gym and take an exercise class.  It’s important to get those endorphins going. 

Try Cooking A New Recipe

Choose a recipe that peaks your interest and try making it.  If it’s a big success then perhaps you can duplicate it for a holiday dinner.  Even if you don’t make it for a holiday dinner you have it in your back pocket of recipes.  If it doesn’t turn out then oh well at least you tried it. 

Favorite Childhood Food

Everyone has a favorite childhood food.  Growing up in Lincoln, Nebraska my mother used to make something called Runzas.  Whenever I need a “childhood comfort shot” I will make Runzas (thank goodness my mother left me the recipe).  My husband grew up Italian in Castro Valley.  During the holidays his aunt would bring an Italian rum cake to the family gatherings.  My husband has been searching for this cake for over 40 years, but can’t seem to find it.  I’ve tried several times to duplicate it from his description.  The point here is, think about what your favorite foods were as a child.  Try and duplicate them and share them with the people that you love.  Trust me…food and memory are powerful things. 

Honor Your Ancestors

Holidays can be emotional.  We all have both happy and sad memories of people who have passed away.  One way to honor those who have passed away is to make their favorite foods. Another is to watch an ancestor’s favorite movie.  My father-in-law’s favorite movies was, “It’s A Wonderful Life.” After he passed away we would take the whole family and go to see, “It’s A Wonderful Life” at the local movie theater.  Not one of us walked out of the theater with dry eyes.  It was powerful, healing and an important holiday ritual.  Take some quiet time to reflect and to be grateful for those people who are gone and were important in your life. 

Forgive Friends & Family

Oftentimes living friends and family can be an emotional challenge.  Forgive them.  Lift the weight off of yourself and simply forgive them.  This doesn’t mean that you should get right back into dysfunction (set boundaries and limitations).  Deal with conflicts from your highest level of goodness and love. 

Make Amends & Forgive Yourself

We have all wronged people that we love. Examine your past emotions and motivations in situations that are nagging your heart.  Make amends; tell that person you are sorry. There is no need to go into “yeah but.”  Simply “I am sorry I did fill in the blank.” Forgive yourself as well.  Most of us are hard on ourselves, which creates stress whether we know it, or not.  We all make mistakes.  Forgive yourself.  At the end of the day, at the end of the holidays the happy memories will not come from presents or material things as much as from genuinely connecting and appreciating your family, friends and yourself. 

 

 

Happy Easter 2013

March 31, 2013

LilyTiny New York Kitchen Wishes You  & Your Family A Very Happy Easter!

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