Watermelon

Jicama

April 22, 2021

Crunchy, juicy, nutrient packed jicama is an unsung hero of the produce aisle. Technically a cousin to green beans, jicama is a root vegetable from Mexico available year-round that is delicious cooked or raw. With a mild, earthy, slightly sweet flavor and an apple like consistency. It’s a great addition to salads, salsas, slaws, and grazing boards. Jicama also works as lighter swap for potatoes in baked and air fried recipes, and it’s delicious sautéed or boiled, too.

If you’ve never tried jicama, don’t be intimidated. Start by choosing one with a smooth, unblemished surface and thin brown skin. The skin should be thin enough to scrape with your thumbnail to reveal the white flesh inside. Avoid thick skinned, bruised, or shriveled jicama, which are signs of aging.

Once you’re ready to prep, start by trimming off the ends of the jicama and slice in half. Then, use a knife to gently peel away the skin.

For Jicama Sticks:
Step 1: Carefully slice off the rounded parts of the jicama, creating a flat surface.
Step 2: Cut each half into 1/4-inch slices.
Step 3: Stack slices and cut evenly into sticks.

Fresh, raw jicama sticks are a great addition to lunchboxes or served on a vegetable platter with your favorite dip. They can also add unexpected, satisfying crunch to cooked dishes, like a noodle salad with jicama and a miso vinaigrette.

Jicama sticks are delicious roasted, too. Their firm texture can withstand the heat, while the edges get golden brown and tender. Toss together with sweet peppers and spices for a simple, satisfying sheet pan side that pairs well with all kinds of meat and fish.

For Diced Jicama:
Step 1: Follow the steps above to create jicama sticks
Step 2: Line up sticks or stack into a pile, then evenly cut into cubes.

Diced jicama is a vitamin and fiber-rich way to add bulk to all kinds of green, grain, and protein-based salads. I love the combination of crunchy jicama with creamy avocado served with grilled chicken.

Moist and mild flavored jicama also plays well with fruit, especially melon. A refreshing combination of watermelon, jicama, and fresh mint falls somewhere between salad and salsa, delicious scooped onto tortilla chips or just spooned straight from the bowl.

Next time you’re at your local grocery store or market pick up jicama and experiment with ways to incorporate it into your recipes.

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2021 All Rights Reserved

Watermelon

August 7, 2018

Here At Tiny New York Kitchen We’re All About Watermelon. It’s So Easy To Choose A Good Watermelon. Look For A Firm, Symmetrical Watermelon That Is Free From Bruises, Cuts Or Dents. Lift It Up. The Watermelon Should Be Heavy For Its Size. Watermelon Is 92% Water, Most Of The Weight Is Water. Turn It Over. The Underside Should Have A Creamy Yellow Spot From Where It Sat On The Ground And Ripened In The Sun. Go Get Yourself A Watermelon Or Two And Enjoy The Refreshing Summer Fruit Until It’s Gone.

Radishes

August 1, 2018

The world of radishes expands way beyond those round red ones you always see at the grocery store. Hit the farmers’ market and you’re likely to find an explosive array of green, purple, and white varieties, each with its own personality and flavor.

Green Meat: This Variety From Northern China Is Like A Regular Daikon, But Smaller And Denser With Green Flesh.

Daikon: These Mild Long White Radishes Are Available At Many Asian Markets And Are Especially Good For Pickling.

Purple Daikon: The Deep Violet And White Colors Make This A Pretty Addition To Any Shaved Salad Or Crudités Platter.

French Breakfast: Treat These Crunch Pink And White Beauties The Way They Deserve – Arranged On A Platter With Good Butter And Flakey Sea Salt For A Simple And Elegant Appetizer.

Easter Egg: These Petite Radishes Range In Color From Dark Purple To Creamy White And Are Sold In Multihued Bunches. They Are Sized Just Right For Shaving On Top Of An Open Face Sandwich.

Watermelon: The Beautiful Neon-Pink Interiors Make A Stunning Garnish For Salads. Cooking Or Pickling Will Dull Their Color, So It’s Best To Keep Them Raw.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2018 All Rights Reserved

Fruit & Olive Oil

July 25, 2018

Drizzling olive oil over savory fruits like tomatoes is second nature, but put it on sweet fruit and people start to think you’re crazy. Consider this: Olive and watermelons are both fruits, and just as vegetable-driven salads need fat to balance salt and acid, fruit salads crave the mouth-coating richness of oil to complement their sweetness and acidity. Olive oil is ideal since it brings a sharp aromatic flavor of its own that carries other savory ingredients, like nutty sharp cheeses and spicy sauce. Look for lighter, grassy oils to avoid overwhelming your fruits, but even a bold, peppery one can play nice with whatever you care to throw at it.

“Work With What You Got!”

©Tiny New York Kitchen © 2018 All Rights Reserved

Watermelon

August 21, 2015

Watermelon

Watermelon is the ultimate summer snack. As a kid growing up in Nebraska, my favorite way to eat watermelon was outside, with the juice running down my face and arms. Here is how I’m eating watermelon this summer.

Treat It Like A Steak
Cut watermelon into 2 inch slabs and drizzle with olive oil. Sprinkle with kosher salt and red pepper flakes. Eat with a steak knife.

Make A BLW
Forget the tomato and use a few thin slices of watermelon on your sandwich instead. Add some cheese for good measure.

Blitz It
Purée watermelon (seeds and all), strain, then add honey, and lime juice. Serve on ice with a mint sprig. Add rum or tequila if you want to be naughty.

“Work With What You Got!”

© Victoria Hart Glavin Tiny New York Kitchen © 2015 All Rights Reserved

Mitchmallows

July 9, 2013

Mitchmallows 3Mitchmallows

Last week I attended New York City’s Fancy Food Show at the Javits Center.  It was a very rainy and muggy day, but I decided to walk there from the East Side anyway.  Naturally the place was packed with vendors and attendees which was exciting to see.  I walked through isle after isle looking at and sampling many food items, but to be honest much of it was the same old jarred salsa, jams and ice cream.  I probably spent a good 2 1/2 hours looking at everything and was getting ready to leave when I realized I had missed a “new products” isle.  I forced myself to give the isle a quick run through even though I had a long walk back in the rain.  I have to say that I was truly happy that I did because I ran into a new product called Mitchmallows.  Typically, I am not a huge fan of marshmallows, but the bow-tie wearing guy behind the booth (Mitch) was super nice and invited me to try the different flavors that he had out for sampling.  I couldn’t believe how good these marshmallows were and tried several different flavors just to make sure.  There were trays of colorful marshmallows like Watermelon, Creamsicle, Pretzels & Beer, Ginger Wasabi, Banana Split, Pink Lemonade, Churros and Maple Syrup Pancake.  My favorites were the Watermelon and Churros flavors.

Most of you know that I don’t write a review of a restaurant or a product unless I really like it.  I am extremely happy that I ran into Mitch and his Mitchmallows.  What a great idea and what a unique food product.  If you’re a fan of marshmallows or even if you’re not into marshmallows you just may want to give these puppies a try.  This was by far the best thing that I found at the Fancy Food Show and the added bonus was meeting the owner who was completely flip over his product.  I’m not sure if Mitchmallows are sold in stores yet, but you can order them from the website.  I saw the packaging and they come in cute little tins.  Go to the website and check it out at http://www.mitchmallows.com/ and tell them that Tiny New York Kitchen sent ya.

Mitchmallows 2Mitchmallows

Easter Menu Ideas

March 30, 2013

Easter 1Easter Menu Ideas

The greatest feast of the Christian Church takes its name from that of Eastre, the Anglo-Saxon goddess of the dawn.  The feast, however, has another name, the Pasch, the Greek word coming from the Hebrew pesakh, the Passover.  This is the term for the feast which is used in nearly every language except English and German, but even these two languages use the words Paschal candle and Paschaltide.  In the churches of the Eastern Orthodox the feast of Easter comes somewhat later than in the Western calendar, but the observance is as great, if not greater.  Here are some Easter feast ideas that may be useful in your home this Sunday.

Easter Breakfast Or Brunch

Mini Frittatas: Cheddar, Asparagus, Sun-Dried Tomato, Swiss, Bacon or Mushroom

Spring Onion Quiches With Gruyere Cheese: Cooked Leeks & Onions With Cheese & A Savory Egg Custard Baked In A Tart Shell

Asparagus, Arugula & Goat Cheese Quiche:  Asparagus, Baby Arugula & Goat Cheese Mixed With Egg Custard Baked In a Flaky Crust

Fresh Fruit Platter:  Sliced Cantaloupe, Honeydew, Watermelon , Pineapple, Grapes & Berries

Easter Appetizers

Asparagus Rolled In Pancetta

Mini Spinach & Ricotta Calzone

Bruschetta

Crudites Platter:  Celery, Broccoli, Cauliflower, Green & Yellow Squash, Sliced Cucumbers, Red/Yellow/Green Bell Peppers, Grape Tomatoes And Baby Carrots

Cheese Platter:  Classic American & European Cheeses Cubes & Wedges For Snacking.  Serve With Almonds & Crostini

Shrimp Cocktail:  Cook, Devein & De-shell Large Shrimp Serve with Lemons & Cocktail Sauce

Smoked Salmon Platter:  Sliced Salmon With Chopped Red Onions, Capers, Cornichons, Mustard Sauce & Horseradish Sauce

Whole Boneless Poached Salmon:  Poached In White Wine With A Light & Creamy Dill Sauce

Soups

Spring Pea & Onion Soup:  Pureed Spring Pea & Onion Soup Made With Celery, Leeks, Garlic & Thyme

Carrot & Fennel Soup:  Carrots, Fennel & Tomatoes Cooked In Vegetable Broth.  Pureed Smooth

Salads & Side Dishes

Shrimp, Spring Pea & Morel Salad:  Shrimp With Crispy Spring Peas, Morel Mushrooms & Tomatoes Lightly Tossed In A Lemon Vinaigrette

Golden Beet, Radish & Frisee Salad:  Golden Beets, Radishes, Frisee Served With Goat Cheese, Pecans & Champagne Vinaigrette.

Grilled Asparagus:  Marinate In Olive Oil & Kosher Salt.  Grill

Gnocchi, Peas & Pancetta:  Gnocchi, Peas, Panchetta, Ricotta Salata, Baby Arugula & Lemon Zest

Entrees

Honey Spiced Turkey Breast: Brine, Slow Roast Finished With Spices & Honey Glaze

Apricot Bourbon Glazed Ham:  Apricot Jam, Honey, Dijon Mustard & Bourbon Combined & Poured On Top Of Ham Then Baked

Victoria’s Apricot Pork Tenderloin

Rosemary Rubbed Leg Of Lamb:  Boneless Leg Of Lamb Marinated In Olive Oil & Herbs Then Roasted To Medium Rare

Grilled Salmon With Crispy Potato & Leek Fondue:  Grilled Salmon Topped With Melted Spring Leeks With A Touch Of Cream & Crispy Fingerling Potatoes

Rack Of Lamb: Roasted With A Variety Of Spices

Desserts

Carrot Cake With Cream Cheese Frosting

Chocolate Cake

Yellow Cake With White Chocolate Ganache

Victoria’s Caramel & Chocolate Pecan Bars

Fruit Tarts

Hot Cross Buns

 

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